2013: we have lift off, with a little help from Tycho Brahe

Welcome to 2013! To get in the mood, here’s a shiny new clip from Brisbane band Tycho Brahe, courtesy of cool Lego clip maker Forlorn Creature:


Now I’m sure there’s a little Depeche Mode in there …


In other recent-ish news:

  • Talie Helene as produced possibly the most memorable quote of the Next Big Thing blog posts: ‘I heard the harpsichord DIE.’
  • NBT the second: Glenda Larke re-releases her debut novel, Havenstar, in digital format! One for my Australian Women Writers review challenge!
  • NBT the third: Charlotte Nash has (non-spec fic) debut Ryders Ridge on the way. First draft written in three weeks. You’d like to hate her, but … that’s just freaking awesome!
  • Graeme Hague has been giving away tunes with his ebooks — what a generous man!
  • Three new Aussie anthologies are showing off their tables of contents: Dreaming of Djinn, Next and A Killer Among Demons. [Make that four: this just popped out of my inbox: Nicole Murphy’s In Fabula-Divino]
  • And huzzah, a new review of Salvage (this one by voracious bookworm Tsana)! I love the way most reviewers have been able to get the idea across without going for the reveal.
  • Way to kick off a new year or what?!

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    A reading from Salvage at MWF

    Twelfth Planet Press held a showcase at Melbourne Writers Festival. Terry Shepherd filmed it. I was first cab off the rank, combining with Talie Helene on simply wonderful musical accompaniment. The reading is the near-drowning scene from Salvage, and things could only go up from there, really! (It was a shame the sound tech was a little slow to turn on our mics; the only glitch in an otherwise awesome effort from the MWF team.)

    Terry has also posted video of the other readings, featuring writers of the Twelve Planets series working the audience over with laughs, suspense and intrigue: a wonderful showcase indeed of the range of stories being brought to the page by this remarkable series from Alisa Krasnostein’s press.

    Alisa couldn’t be present on the night, having to be in Perth to collect a small business achievement award, so at least now she can see what we got up to!

    You can watch Showcase readings from:

  • Deborah Biancotti
  • Narrelle M Harris
  • Rosaleen Love
  • Kirstyn McDermott
  • Cat Sparks
  • Lucy Sussex
  • Kaaron Warren
  • While at Terry’s YouTube channel, check out Terry’s short films and creative advertising.

    Snapshot 2012: Talie Helene

    australian speculative fiction snapshot 2012 logoTALIE HELENE is a musician and writer, from Melbourne. She has poetry published in journals including Voiceworks, Avant and Inkshed, and Mary Manning’s About Poetry (Oxford University Press), and a co-authored short story (with Martin Livings) ‘The Last Gig of Jimmy Rucker’ in More Scary Kisses (edited by Liz Grzyb). Talie is horror editor for the anthology The Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror (Ticonderoga Publications), and was news editor for the Australian Horror Writers’ Association for four years (2006-2010), for which she received a Ditmar nomination. She is a member of the SuperNova writers’ group. Talie has a background in music journalism – especially extreme genres – and has performed with many artists including The Tenth Stage, Wendy Rule, Sean Bowley, Saba Persian Orchestra, Maroondah Symphony, and Eden. She is currently developing a new audio arts anthology titled The Unquiet Grave. You can find out more at www.taliehelene.com.

    What are the pleasures and perils of compiling the horror component of the Ticonderoga Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror?
    One of the guiding principals I have is that the stories need to go to different emotional places, because horror is about hitting raw nerves. If you hit the same nerve too many times, you desensitise and the stories become emotionally monochrome. Horror is unique in that the genre is defined by emotion, rather than trope or context – you can have a completely supernatural story that is horror, and a totally realistic story that is also horror. So trying to keep the mix fresh and blow the readers away in different ways, keep the emotional impact – that is pure fun. Editing a Year’s Best is a bit like being a DJ. The works are already published and polished, so the job is to find that mix of hits and undiscovered gems and make the overall experience entertaining and powerful and surprising. It’s a kick!

    Working with Liz and Russell at Ticonderoga is totally a pleasure. I was a dark horse choice for this editing job, and having them believe in my instincts is very humbling. They are also really understanding, and they’ve been very supportive throughout. Having a purpose that isn’t focused on my own headspace has probably been a saving grace for me. Just getting to associate with such fine writers is a buzz and an honour; meeting some of ‘my authors’ and having these instantly engaging conversations about narrative that I would never otherwise have is a delight.

    The perils. Well, there should be perils in compiling horror, right?

    I think probably the biggest peril is balancing literary horror and visceral horror; horror goes to places that connect with visceral responses, and it goes to places of deep trauma and danger and anger, and sex and death are so very tangled together. If the emotion overwhelms the form it can be incomprehensible, and if the form overwhelms the emotion you get cliche. The quality that lifts both aspects up is authenticity. I’m just one person, so I have to trust my own instincts as to which stories do which of those things excellently. Just entering that territory is perilous, because when people disagree they will disagree vehemently. Conversely, if I didn’t stick to my guns about my choices, I have no business editing horror.

    I worship what I would call literary horror – writing that engages with top-shelf word craft and narrative constructs in the service of hitting those raw nerves. In the Capital L Literature world the idea of ‘literary horror’ is regarded as an oxymoron. The reality of any genre is you have to read through a truckload of mediocrity to find the amazing work. Go to a Capital L Literary spoken word night. You will have to endure an avalanche of bullshit to experience a few dazzling talents. But I think it’s harder for people to go the other way – from the literary world, to the horror world – because horror stories do contain exploded intestines! The bad ones have exploded intestines! The brilliant ones have exploded intestines! It takes a committed reader to learn to separate being repulsed by bad gory writing, and enthralled by brilliant gory writing – which is also repulsive! But repulsive in the service of some larger meaning.

    Really great horror stories aren’t just about horror – there is always something else that makes you empathise. That’s the reason Stephen King writes so much about love and different kinds of relationships. If you write about death, you write about life. I think horror is the deepest genre because it speaks from that precipice of our mortality. But I’m not allowed to harpoon people who don’t share that view!

    While I prize literary horror, I also feel very connected with visceral horror. There would be something really wrong if the horror selection in Year’s Best didn’t include some stories where things that are supposed to be inside people are splashed all over the page – maybe that is blood, or a terrible secret, or unbearable knowledge. I think there are people who read horror and appraise the shock value over the literary merit – that reader is going to roll their eyes at terror in sunlight stories or existential horror. For me, blood and the numinous are equally powerful. By making a broad selection, I’m demanding the reader be open to all of that.

    Is that condescending? I don’t mean to be condescending to consider that a peril. My gut tells me horror writers feel that they put great demands on readers too, and that is one of the issues of commercialism (or lack of) for horror.

    There is an amorphous danger zone of gender politics in the speculative fiction community in Australia, and in horror more than any other genre. It is in part due to a disparity in theorised feminism, because writers range from all walks of life – can I say thank fuck? That is something I can appreciate from both sides, because I’m not a theorised feminist myself. (I don’t have a degree, and while I do read feminist musicology with interest, I’m truant on Feminism 101.) I think the sticking point is that horror is often violent, and historically violence precedes from the patriarchy, so there has been confusion in separating confronting language from gendered language.

    As horror editor of the Year’s Best, I’ve had to remain silent on feminist issues I might have otherwise been very vocal about, because I have conflict of interest – and I support people in their artistic practice who have completely contradictory views, including views that I don’t agree with. It doesn’t mean I’m not participating in the discourse, because I will recognise writers who are disrupting and interrogating those issues in their work, and that becomes an influence in my editorial process. I want the anthology to be a powder keg of awesome! My philosophy is stolen from an old 3RRR Radio Station ID: ‘Diversity in the face of adversity’.

    A more personal peril is discovering if I don’t include a writer’s stories, I can hurt the feelings of a friend – and maybe give them the erroneous impression that they had ‘a bad year’. While the words ‘best’ and ‘horror’ are the stars by which I navigate in story selection, there are also other pressures on the selection process – and not every fine story on the shortlist makes it through. It does not always mean those stories aren’t as good – or that I am prejudiced against a certain flavour of horror and won’t ever include it. This is the arts. It is subjective. It has to be subjective. And the DJ part of the editorial process serves a mix, not just an evaluation.

    The final peril is for me as an emerging writer. Donning the hat of gatekeeper threatens to crush my view of my own writing with 10,000 tonnes of neurosis. (And that’s what SuperNova is for?)

    You’ve got a Ditmar-nominated short ghost story co-written with Martin Livings: is this a sign that we might be seeing more Talie Helene stories out in the wild soon, and is the supernatural likely to play a role in new material?
    If by soon you mean ever, then the answer is ‘eventually’. It’s a sign! The stories I have in progress have supernatural elements, although that wasn’t a conscious choice. You can’t really marinate your brain in horror fiction without soaking up the supernatural – and it kind of crunches down to writing emotion. I was already into it, but how tumultuous and marginalised my life has been in the past few years has probably pushed me deeper into it. You can write emotion through the supernatural that might not translate if you tried to deliver it Capital L Literary style. I don’t want to jinx the writing by turning this into a publicity blurb for unpublished work. I need to submit an ‘unavailable form’ to my retail job for SuperNova Sundays, and be humble or shameless with bringing drafts to the table.


    You’re known for being a musician and a writer, and ‘The Last Gig of Jimmy Rucker’ combines the two: in what ways do those two creative pursuits influence each other in your practice?
    Your question makes it sound nice, Jason. My stock answer is ‘they are the two halves of my heart’ – but right now, fox-holed in a robotic random day job, wearing a plastic smile and folding knickers in a department store – music and writing feel like combatants! They both fight for time and energy I barely have, and one is always stealing time from the other, so of course the other claws in as an influence. Anything beyond writing, that a writer spends time immersed in – history, physics, maths, or philosophy – that is going to influence them. That goes both for social engagement – dialogue colour and character – and for soaking up information that ignites ideas. Whatever boards you tread – the squeaky boards there are your story. Especially if the dark stuff sings to you.

    So that kind of influence… I’d like to think my diction and structural sense of drama are influenced by music. I’m definitely influenced by the more personal ways people use music, and that is always a place of story – to grieve, to love, to evoke memory, to escape, to heal, to endure, to mark time, to hide from or find themselves, as a mask, as a drug, as an excuse, as redemption, as Dutch courage, a mating cry, a war cry, a goodbye…

    There is something really spooky about singing a Dorian mode with a bunch of other music students. It is intended as an aural drill, but sometimes it hits you that you are inside an ancient structure – and it gives you shivers.

    What Australian works have you loved recently?
    I’ll tell you about some things I didn’t anthologise. I had post-it notes plastered all over them – one saying ‘HELLYEAH!’ and one with a sad face and ‘NOT HORROR’.

    Two stories from Cat Sparks – ‘The Alabaster Child‘ and ‘Beautiful‘ – were both completely immersive science fiction with a distinct visual style. Cat is one of the best visual stylists in Australia, which is not surprising given her involvement in design and photography. She studies colour and light all the time. Thoraiya Dyer‘s ‘Fruit Of The Peepal Tree‘ was the most delicately painted and subtly paced story I read from 2011, and I’m so glad it won the Aurealis in the Fantasy Short Story category, because I was shattered I couldn’t use it for Year’s Best. Even touching on dark themes of loss, environmental degradation, and female infanticide – it didn’t riff the emotion of a horror story, but it was an exquisite story.

    The Rage Against The Night anthology Shane Jiraiya Cummings edited as a fundraiser – while under-the-radar locally, that was an impressive collection. The excerpts I’ve seen from Rocky Wood and Greg Chapman’s Witch Hunts: A Graphic History of the Burning Times (with Lisa Morton) look kickarse.

    What have been some of the biggest changes in Australian speculative fiction in the past two years since Aussiecon 4?
    Given that I have an Atheling nomination for a 2010 Year in Review essay (co-authored with Liz Grzyb), and I’m gap-filling the 2011 review essay right now – it is absurd, but I don’t feel that qualified to answer this question, because I only really follow the horror. I’m kind of new as a writer and an outsider in the Australian speculative fiction enclave – and I’m tremendously self-involved. The PR Bitch answer would be to say Ticonderoga Publications launched a Year’s Best Australian Fantasy & Horror series, right? The size of the two boxes of Year’s Best reading – 2010 and 2011 – 2010 weighs in as a year of bigger output, but the marketing impetus of a Worldcon makes that almost a given.

    Australian spec fic had an international profile boost with all those international practitioners visiting Melbourne. While I’d never dream of suggesting it was the reason Alisa Krasnostein and Twelfth Planet Press scored a World Fantasy Award, I think the wave of Aussiecon4 helped an already deserving and enterprising nominee – and this is a good and natural development, and I’m cheering that success on.

    The bowing out of Brimstone Press certainly changed the playing field for local horror writers. Bummer. The AHWA seems to have lost cohesion, but I can see a rallying point emerging with Marty Young executive editing Midnight Echo.

    The unfortunate melee that Robin Pen hilariously sketched as ‘Ballad of the Unrequited Ditmar‘ seemed to cause a lot of hurt – factions seem delineated, which I think is a pity because in a scene this small we all move forward together. (Who knew I was such a hippy?)

    I think the true biggest change – to paraphrase the words of Bren MacDibble – there is a Paul Haines shaped hole in the world. For the broad generation of Paul’s contemporaries, the wave of writers around him, that loss is going to be felt for a long time. Art doesn’t evolve in a slow creep, it leaps forward with bold thinkers and original voices, and then other practitioners play catch-up. I’m not saying he is the only trailblazer in Australia, but that ego Paul always talked about having – to my mind was just that awareness. He was a leap forward kind of artist. He was special. He knew it. The curtailing of that brave talent is the biggest change I’ve seen, and the saddest.

    * * *

    THIS interview was conducted as part of the 2012 Snapshot of Australian Speculative Fiction. We’re blogging interviews from 1-8 June and archiving them at Australian Speculative Fiction in Focus. You can read interviews at:

    Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror 2011

    years best australian fantasy and horror 2011


    A gorgeous cover and a splendid table of contests, a real feast of Aussie writers working in fantasy and horror: and me! I am so thrilled that ‘Wraiths’, from Winds of Change, made the fantasy list of Ticonderoga’s Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2011 (now available to order), edited by Talie Helene and Liz Grzyb. Well done, all; what splendid company to be keeping — my wife included: here, look for yourself!

    Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2011 selected stories

  • Peter M Ball, ‘Briar Day’ (Moonlight Tuber)
  • Lee Battersby, ‘Europe After The Rain’ (After the Rain, Fablecroft Press)
  • Deborah Biancotti, ‘Bad Power’ (Bad Power, Twelfth Planet Press)
  • Jenny Blackford, ‘The Head in the Goatskin Bag’ (Kaleidotrope)
  • Simon Brown, ‘Thin Air’ (Dead Red Heart, Ticonderoga Publications)
  • David Conyers and David Kernot, ‘Winds Of Nzambi’ (Midnight Echo #6, AHWA)
  • Stephen Dedman, ‘More Matter, Less Art’ (Midnight Echo #6, AHWA)
  • Sara Douglass and Angela Slatter, ‘The Hall of Lost Footsteps’ (The Hall of Lost Footsteps, Ticonderoga Publications)
  • Felicity Dowker, ‘Berries & Incense’ (More Scary Kisses, Ticonderoga Publications)
  • Terry Dowling, ‘Dark Me, Night You’ (Midnight Echo #5, AHWA)
  • Jason Fischer, ‘Hunting Rufus’ (Midnight Echo #5, AHWA)
  • Christopher Green, ‘Letters Of Love From The Once And Newly Dead’ (Midnight Echo #5, AHWA)
  • Paul Haines, ‘The Past Is A Bridge Best Left Burnt’ (The Last Days of Kali Yuga, Brimstone Press)
  • Lisa L Hannett, ‘Forever, Miss Tapekwa County’ (Bluegrass Symphony, Ticonderoga Publications)
  • Richard Harland, ‘At The Top Of The Stairs’ (Shadows and Tall Trees #2, Undertow Publications)
  • John Harwood, ‘Face To Face’ (Ghosts by Gaslight, HarperCollins)
  • Pete Kempshall, ‘Someone Else To Play With’ (Beauty Has Her Way, Dark Quest Books)
  • Jo Langdon, ‘Heaven’ (After the Rain, Fablecroft Press)
  • Maxine McArthur, ‘The Soul of the Machine’ (Winds of Change, CSFG)
  • Ian McHugh, ‘The Wishwriter’s Wife’ (Daily Science Fiction)
  • Andrew J McKiernan, ‘Love Death’ (Aurealis #45, Chimaera Publications)
  • Kirstyn McDermott, “Frostbitten” (More Scary Kisses, Ticonderoga Publications)
  • Margaret Mahy, “Wolf Night” (The Wilful Eye – Tales From the Tower #1, Allen & Unwin)
  • Anne Mok, ‘Interview with the Jiangshi’ (Dead Red Heart, Ticonderoga Publications)
  • Jason Nahrung, ‘Wraiths’ (Winds of Change, CSFG)
  • Anthony Panegyres, ‘Reading Coffee’ (Overland, OL Society)
  • Tansy Rayner Roberts, ‘The Patrician’ (Love and Romanpunk, Twelfth Planet Press)
  • Angela Rega, ‘Love In the Atacama or the Poetry of Fleas’ (Crossed Genres, CGP)
  • Angela Slatter, ‘The Coffin-Maker’s Daughter’ (A Book of Horrors, Jo Fletcher Books)
  • Lucy Sussex, ‘Thief of Lives” (Thief of Lies, Twelfth Planet Press)
  • Kyla Ward, ‘The Kite’ (The Land of Bad Dreams, P’rea Press)
  • Kaaron Warren, ‘All You Can Do Is Breathe’ (Blood and Other Cravings, Tor)
  • Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2010

    years best australian fantasy and horrorIt’s great to see that someone has risen to fill the gap (almost) left by Brimstone (horror and dark fantasy) and MirrorDanse (science fiction and fantasy) no longer compiling a year’s ‘best of’ of Australian spec fic. Awards listings have been the best guide to quality Aussie writing in their absence.

    But Ticonderoga Publications is releasing a best of: fantasy and horror published in 2010, edited by Talie Helene and Liz Grzyb. It’s the first of an ongoing annual snapshot. The contents have already been released, and now, the recommended reading list. What a superb springboard into an exploration of flights of fancy from Australian pens!

    best australian fantasy and horror 2010 contents

    RJ Astruc: “Johnny and Babushka”
    Peter M Ball: “L’esprit de L’escalier”
    Alan Baxter: “The King’s Accord”
    Jenny Blackford: “Mirror”
    Gitte Christensen: “A Sweet Story”
    Matthew Chrulew: “Schubert By Candlelight”
    Bill Congreve: “Ghia Likes Food”
    Rjurik Davidson: “Lovers In Caeli-Amur”
    Felicity Dowker: “After the Jump”
    Dale Elvy: “Night Shift”
    Jason Fischer: “The School Bus”
    Dirk Flinthart: “Walker”
    Bob Franklin: “Children’s Story”
    Christopher Green: “Where We Go To Be Made Lighter”
    Paul Haines: “High Tide At Hot Water Beach”
    L.L. Hannett: “Soil From My Fingers”
    Stephen Irwin: “Hive”
    Gary Kemble: “Feast Or Famine”
    Pete Kempshall: “Brave Face”
    Tessa Kum: “Acception”
    Martin Livings: “Home”
    Maxine McArthur: “A Pearling Tale”
    Kirstyn McDermott: “She Said”
    Andrew McKiernan: “The Memory Of Water”
    Ben Peek: “White Crocodile Jazz”
    Simon Petrie: “Dark Rendezvous”
    Lezli Robyn: “Anne-droid of Green Gables”
    Angela Rega: “Slow Cookin’ ”
    Angela Slatter: “The Bone Mother”
    Angela Slatter & LL Hannett: “The February Dragon”
    Grant Stone: “Wood”
    Kaaron Warren: “That Girl”
    Janeen Webb: “Manifest Destiny”

    recommended reading list, australian fantasy and horror 2010

    Deborah Biancotti, ‘Home Turf’ Baggage
    Jenny Blackford, ‘Adam’ Kaleidotrope #9
    Simon Brown, ‘Sweep’ Sprawl
    Mary Elizabeth Burroughs, ‘The Flinchfield Dance’ Black Static #17
    Steve Cameron, ‘Ghost Of The Heart’ Festive Fear
    Stephanie Campisi, ‘Seven’ Scenes From The Second Storey
    Matthew Chrulew, ‘The Nullabor Wave’ World’s Next Door
    Bill Congreve, ‘The Traps of Tumut’ Souls Along The Meridian
    Rjurik Davidson, ‘The Cinema Of Coming Attractions’ The Library of Forgotten Books
    Stephen Dedman, ‘For Those In Peril On The Sea’ Haunted Legends
    Felicity Dowker, ‘From Little Things’ Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #43
    ——— ‘The House On Juniper Road’ Worlds Next Door
    ——— ‘Bread And Circuses’ Scary Kisses
    Will Elliott, ‘Dhayban’ Macabre: A Journey Through Australia’s Darkest Fears
    Mark Farrugia, ‘A Bag Full Of Arrows’ Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #48
    Jason Fischer, ‘The House Of Nameless’ Writers of the Future Vol. xxvi
    Bob Franklin, ‘Take The Free Tour’ Under Stones
    Christopher Green, ‘Jumbuck’ Aurealis #44
    Paul Haines, ‘Her Gallant Needs’ Sprawl
    Lisa L Hannett, ‘Singing Breath Into The Dead’ Music For Another World
    ——— ‘Commonplace Sacrifices’ On Spec
    ——— Tiny Drops’ Midnight Echo #4
    Richard Harland, ‘Shakti’ Tales of the Talisman
    ——— ‘The Fear’ Macabre: A Journey Through Australia’s Darkest Fears
    Narrelle M Harris, ‘The Truth About Brains’ Best New Zombie Tales: Volume 2
    Robert Hood, ‘Wasting Matilda’ The Mammoth Book Of The Zombie Apocalypse
    George Ivanoff, ‘Trees’ Short & Scary
    Trent Jamieson, ‘The Driver’s Assistant’ Ticon4
    Pete Kempshall, ‘Dead Letter Drop’ Close Encounters of the Urban Kind
    ——— ‘Signature Walk’ Sprawl
    Martin Livings, ‘Lollo’ Close Encounters of the Urban Kind
    Penelope Love, ‘Border Crossing’ Belong
    Geoffrey Maloney & Andrew Bakery, ‘Sleeping Dogs’ Midnight Echo #4
    Tracie McBride, ‘Lest We Forget’ (audio) Spectrum Collection
    Kirstyn McDermott, ‘Monsters Among Us’ Macabre: A Journey Through Australia’s Darkest Fears
    Andrew J McKiernan, ‘All The Clowns In Clown Town’; Macabre: A Journey Through Australia’s Darkest Fears
    Simon Petrie, ‘Running Lizard’ Rare Unsigned Copy: tales of Rocketry, Ineptitude, and Giant Mutant Vegetables
    Michael Radburn, ‘They Own The Night’ Festive Fear
    Janeen Samuel, ‘My Brother Quentin’ Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #44
    Angela Slatter, ‘A Porcelain Soul’ Sourdough and other stories
    ——— ‘Gallowberries’ Sourdough and other stories
    ——— ‘The Dead Ones Don’t Hurt You’ The Girl With No Hands and other tales
    Cat Sparks, ‘All the Love in the World’ Sprawl
    Grant Stone, ‘Dead Air’ (poem) Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #46
    Lucy Sussex, ‘Albert & Victoria/Slow Dreams’ Baggage
    Anna Tambour, ‘Gnawer Of The Moon Seeks Summit Of Paradise’ Sprawl
    Kaaron Warren, ‘Sins Of The Ancestors’ Dead Sea Fruit
    ——— ‘The Coral Gatherer’ Dead Sea Fruit
    ——— ‘Hive Of Glass’ Baggage
    David Witteveen, ‘Perfect Skin’ Cthulhu’s Dark Cults